Women in (M)usic, (A)rts, (D)esign

By MAD

Women's Day Blog MAD It’s the twenty-first century and we’re all still fighting for the things we believe in, in art, in music, in design and in life. We’re still fighting for basic needs, we’re still fighting to have our voices be heard, we’re fighting for equality but more importantly, we’re fighting for human rights. There’s always an underdog and it’s not unnatural that these people constantly fight for their rights. This month, it’s women who are fighting; in the end, human liberty should be always be regarded, regardless of sex.

Speak up, speak up.
During MAD’s Artist Meet Up in Beirut, Lise Yacoub discussed the importance of women’s vast inclusion in the art world. Today more than ever, women all over the world are standing up and speaking up about the rights that they deserve, their inclusion in political, social and other fields as well as their equality among many other issues. Today more than ever, it’s important for every woman to do so.

Back to roots.
Before Women’s History Month was celebrated, the more popular International Women’s Day was designated on March 8 of every year to celebrate all the powerful and influential women who have, and continue to, fight for women’s rights. This dates back to the 1900s, when the day was originally proposed in the US and continued to spread among other countries throughout the years. It was officially recognized by the United Nations in 1975 and is celebrated every year worldwide through demonstrations and events.

So what is Women’s History Month?
Historically, Women’s History Month first started off as Women’s Week in the 1980’s. By 1995, March was officially declared as Women’s History Month in the United States. The month aims to raise awareness and knowledge about women’s contributions throughout history. The end goal is to recognize the different efforts put in by women, all of which have contributed in making social, political, environmental and other kinds of advancements and changes.

How does it link to women in arts?
Although it is said that women tend to be more creative than men, the representation of women in art fields remains to be minimal; even if that weren’t the case, the number of women artists striving to “make it” while their male counterparts have already “made it” is pretty high. Statistically, more male painters have their artworks portrayed in galleries than women. In the music industry, less than 30% of women ever make it to the top charts and in design, studies have proven that women are still the minority. Unfortunately, this reflects global insights.

Now what?
It’s our duty to always encourage all women: sisters, friends, girlfriends, acquaintances, colleagues, etc. to continue the fight to be heard, to be given equal opportunities and to be free. This happens by recognizing women’s history month and that women deserve to be as “out there” as men, in the workforce, in their freedom to express and in their basic needs.

Happy Women’s History month to all our artistic sisters!

 

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